UK court orders Vijay Mallya’s extradition to India

UK court orders Vijay Mallya's extradition to India
Mallya’s legal team has 14 days to appeal against the order

Beleaguered industrialist Vijay Mallya must be extradited from the UK to India, where he is accused of committing bank frauds of Rs 9,000 crore, a London court ruled on Monday.

Mallya, wanted in India on charges of fraud and money laundering, appeared before the Westminster Magistrates’ Court in London where his extradition trial was listed for judgment today.

The Westminster Magistrates Court gave the ruling following a prolonged litigation involving Mallya, who fled India in March 2016. The 62-year-old’s legal team now has 14 days to appeal against the order.

The ruling is a major victory for the investigating agencies like the CBI and the Enforcement Directorate (ED) who were probing Mallya’s case.

“We hope to bring him soon and conclude the case. CBI has its own inherent strengths. We worked hard on this case. We are strong on law and facts and we were confident while pursuing the extradition process,” a CBI spokesperson said.

The decision came six days after British national and middleman in the Rs 3,600 core AgustaWestland VVIP chopper deal, Christian Michael, was extradited to India from Dubai.

Mallya has repeatedly denied fleeing from India and said he was ready to pay back the money he owed to Indian banks.

Proceedings are on before the Mumbai Special Court against Mallya under the Fugitive Economic Offenders Act.

If extradited, Mallya will be lodged in one of the high-security barracks located in a two-storey building inside the Arthur Road prison complex, which also housed 26/11 Mumbai attack terrorist Mohammad Ajmal Kasab.

The prison authorities have already kept a high security cell ready for the liquor tycoon. The high security barracks are located separately from other cells and are under constant CCTV surveillance, with security guards stationed round the clock.


Also Read: “Please take it”: 2 years after fleeing India, Mallya offers to repay 100% to banks


 

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